Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Contributor

BSR Contributor Since July 23, 2019

Brad Rothbart (they/them pronouns) is a non-binary, multivalent theaterworker, a hopeless utopian, and a diaresis fanboy. In addition to BSR, their writing has appeared in TheatreForum and American Theatre.

Brad Rothbart is currently working as a freelance dramaturg and theater theorist. They graduated from Sarah Lawrence College in 1989. From 1992-1997 they performed and toured with The Living Theatre. In 1994, Brad became one of the original members of the RAT Conference, a loose association of alternative theaters across the United States. 1995 brought an opportunity to perform and present at the ThisAbility Conference in Ann Arbor, a conference that spawned the seminal disability arts film, Vital Signs: Crip Culture Talks Back.

During the 1999-2000 theater season, Brad created and curated a reading series called Underground Voices: From the Marginalized to the Transgressive at Theatre Double in Philadelphia. The series presented under-heard American playwrights who are dedicated to stretching the boundaries of the theatrical experience. TheatreForum published Brad's academic essay Ahistoricity, Multiplicity and Velocity: Radical Discontinuity and its Effects on the Dramaturgical Process in TF 21 (Summer/Fall 2001). They graduated from Stanford University in 2007 with an MA in Drama. Their essay, Once More Unto The Breach: An Anatomized Philippic Regarding the Relationship of Disability to the Contemporary American Theatre, was published by American Theatre in October 2015.

By this Author

21 results
Page 1
A masterclass in emotional vulnerability: Laiona Michelle as Sugar in 'Tiny Beautiful Things.' (Image courtesy of George Street Playhouse.)

George Street Playhouse presents Nia Vardalos’s ‘Tiny Beautiful Things’

Discovering Dear Sugar

The power of truth-telling is on display in ‘Tiny Beautiful Things,’ the stage adaptation of Cheryl Strayed’s best-selling book. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Reviews 3 minute read
Prodigious talents: real-life partners Rajeer Alford and Elena Camp team up for 11th Hour’s ‘Home Fries at Home.’ (Photo by Wide Eyed Studios.)

Philly Theatre Week: 11th Hour presents ‘Home Fries at Home: Music for the Soul’

Potatoes and potential

Elena Camp and Rajeer Alford show off musical and epicurean talents in 11th Hour Theatre Company’s Philly Theatre Week streaming production, ‘Home Fries at Home: Music for the Soul.’ Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Reviews 3 minute read
Untying experiments in streaming theater: Lindsay Smiling in the Wilma’s ‘Expired.’ (Image courtesy of the Wilma.)

The Wilma presents the HotHouse Company’s ‘Expired’ and ‘Lagniappe Project’

Short innovations

The Wilma Theater shows off its versatility with ‘Expired’ and ‘The Lagniappe Project,’ the latest in its HotHouse Shorts series. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Reviews 4 minute read
Windows on mental illness: a scene from ‘The Manic Monologues.’ (Image courtesy of McCarter Theatre.)

McCarter Theatre Center presents ‘The Manic Monologues’

No longer alone

‘The Manic Monologues,’ an interdisciplinary streaming theatrical experience from McCarter and other partners, enlists actors to tell true stories gathered from people living with mental illness. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Reviews 4 minute read
Not a Christian monolith:Jered McLenigan as Justin, Campbell O’Hare as Emily, and Sarah Gliko as Teresa in the Wilma’s ‘Heroes of the Fourth Turning.’ (Image via videography by Jorge Cousineau, courtesy of the Wilma.)

The Wilma presents Will Arbery’s ‘Heroes of the Fourth Turning’

Truth outside the bubble

In the Wilma’s 'Heroes of the Fourth Turning,' playwright Will Arbery uses both intellect and unfettered emotion to address the fundamental issues facing a divided USA. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Reviews 5 minute read
‘It Can’t Happen Here’ got its Berkeley Rep premiere as a stage adaptation in 2016. (Photo by Kevin Berne, courtesy of Berkeley Repertory Theatre.)

Berkeley Rep presents ‘It Can’t Happen Here,’ a radio play streaming nationwide

It’s already happening here

In its radio-play adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s 'It Can’t Happen Here,' Berkeley Rep makes us confront ourselves. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 5 minute read
When do lies become truth and truth become lies? Anthony Martinez-Briggs and Brett Ashley Robinson in the Wilma’s ‘Describe the Night.’ (Photo by Johanna Austin.)

The Wilma Theater presents Rajiv Joseph’s ‘Describe the Night’

Truth and lies, then and now

In a theatrical epic, playwright Rajiv Joseph uses Soviet history to make us look at ourselves, right now in the United States. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 3 minute read
An extremely talented trio: Marcia Saunders, Graham Smith, and Janis Dardaris in ‘The Children’ at People’s Light. (Image courtesy of People’s Light.)

People’s Light presents Lucy Kirkwood’s ‘The Children’

A fresh voice for old friends

In a fine production at People's Light, Lucy Kirkwood's 'The Children' brings a human scale to the kind of story that often feels overwhelming. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 3 minute read
She’s just a dead Frenchwoman: John Jarboe as Edith Piaf in ‘All I Want for Christmas is a Dead Chanteuse.’ (Photo by Kristin Ross.)

The Bearded Ladies present ‘All I Want for Christmas Is a Dead Chanteuse’

A revolutionary holiday

If we’re having Christmas in July, why not Bastille Day in December? The Bearded Ladies sang of revolution in a holiday-ish cabaret at World Café Live. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Essays 4 minute read
Sweet, sultry, fun, and fierce: Sutton Foster stormed the Merriam. (Image courtesy of the Kimmel Center.)

The Kimmel Center presents 'An Evening with Sutton Foster'

An open letter to Sutton Foster

In a one-night solo performance at the Merriam, Tony Award-winning Broadway star Sutton Foster offered a transcendent performance as an artist at the height of her powers. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 3 minute read
Reclaiming the old tradition of performance art: Ali Asgar in ‘Roopbaan Reimagined.’ (Image courtesy of Louis Kang and Asian Arts Initiative.)

Asian Arts Initiative and Qunify present Ali Asgar's ‘Roopbaan Reimagined'

You live in America in 2019

A unique performance from Bangladesh native Ali Asgar found the true roots of performance art while reimagining an ancient folktale for today. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Essays 5 minute read
'our ouija board'' is another bold, queer, terrifying, hilarious show from ON THE ROCKS. (Photo courtesy of ON THE ROCKS)

Philly Fringe 2019: On The Rocks presents ‘our ouija board’

The future of theater?

On The Rocks, a hip young Philly company with a bold, queer, out-of-the-box vision, stakes their claim to the future of theater in this year’s Fringe. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 2 minute read
How far would you go for a loved one who loved Wawa? Taiwo Sokan and Jahzeer Terrell in ‘Operation Wawa Road Trip.’ (Photo by Terry Brennan.)

Philly Fringe 2019: Tribe of Fools presents ‘Operation Wawa Road Trip’

They do it better

High expectations for Tribe of Fools may leave you wanting more from the Fringe’s ‘Operation Wawa Road Trip.’ Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 2 minute read
Are you experiencing the art? Or experiencing yourself experiencing the art? (Photo by Molly McShane.)

Philly Fringe 2019: Hella Fresh Theater presents John Rosenberg’s ‘Autopia’

The play’s not the thing

When language is a limiter: in the Fringe’s ‘Autopia,’ the play is not the thing. Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 3 minute read
Hestia’s ‘Richard III’ blazes a new path to Shakespeare. (Photo by Adaeze Nwoko.)

Philly Fringe 2019: Hestia Theatre Company presents Shakespeare’s ‘Richard III’

Problematic history, uncertain present

Reclaiming their time; claiming their space. Hestia Theatre mounts a feminist revisioning of ‘Richard III.’ Brad Rothbart reviews.
Brad Rothbart

Brad Rothbart

Articles 2 minute read