Books

297 results
Page 5
Is the future of American democracy written at the local level? (Image courtesy of Temple University Press.)

‘Philadelphia Battlefields’ by John Kromer

Not the usual suspects

Are Philly elections a foregone conclusion? No, says ‘Philadelphia Battlefields,’ a new book on political upstarts from Rendell to Rhynhart. Pamela Forsythe reviews.

Pamela J. Forsythe

Articles 5 minute read
Not here to explain the meaning of disability. (Image courtesy of Vintage Books.)

‘Disability Visibility,’ edited by Alice Wong

Being in our own words

‘Disability Visibility,’ a first-person story collection that arrived along with the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, is a platform where diverse disabled voices live in their own words. Alaina Johns reviews.
Alaina Johns

Alaina Johns

Articles 4 minute read
What happens when wealth tumbles in for generations? (Image via Penguin Random House.)

'The Beneficiary' by Janny Scott

Bobby, we hardly knew ye

Robert Montgomery Scott, the late president of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, inherited a legacy that many of us might envy. But 'The Beneficiary,' his daughter’s unblinking post mortem, raises the old question: Is great wealth a blessing or a curse? Dan Rottenberg reviews.
Dan Rottenberg

Dan Rottenberg

Articles 6 minute read
A must-read for people interested in design, urban planning, and Philly politics. (Image courtesy of Rutgers University Press.)

‘Becoming Philadelphia’ by Inga Saffron

New city, new readers

‘Becoming Philadelphia’ gathers a new collection of columns by longtime Inquirer architecture critic Inga Saffron, but the book’s construction leaves something to be desired. Judy Weightman reviews.
Judy Weightman

Judy Weightman

Articles 5 minute read
We can’t mythologize pregnancy apart from embodied experience. (Image courtesy of Bold Type Books.)

‘Belabored’ by Lyz Lenz

An experience of pregnancy

Lyz Lenz’s ‘Belabored’ offers no solutions to the rampant anxieties of the present, but its bold centering of the realities of pregnancy offers something we may need even more. T.S. Mendola reviews.
T.S. Mendola

T.S. Mendola

Articles 3 minute read
A book for all people who use their voice. (Image courtesy of Barcelona Publishing.)

‘The Use of Voice in Music Therapy’ by Kelly Meashey

Long live every voice

‘The Use of Voice in Music Therapy,’ the first book from Philadelphia jazz singer Kelly Meashey, teaches singers and clinicians alike how to connect with an audience. Suzanne Cloud reviews.
Suzanne Cloud

Suzanne Cloud

Articles 4 minute read
A love letter to Philly in 1985? (Image via allauthor.com.)

‘PUNKS’ by Richard Cucarese

Missing Philly’s punk ethos

‘PUNKS,’ the debut novel by Richard Cucarese, visits 1980s Philadelphia without sampling the social context that would’ve been so relevant today. Michelle Nugent reviews.
Michelle Nugent

Michelle Nugent

Articles 3 minute read
What makes a perfect wife? Maybe the standard recipe hasn’t changed as much as we think. (Image courtesy of Dutton.)

‘Recipe for a Perfect Wife’ by Karma Brown

Dark domesticity

Karma Brown’s ‘Recipe for a Perfect Wife’ follows a woman who finds a cookbook in her new home that connects her to the life of a previous resident, a seemingly perfect housewife from another era. But dark secrets resonate in both women’s lives. Elisa Shoenberger reviews.
Elisa Shoenberger

Elisa Shoenberger

Articles 3 minute read

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Xandria Phillips’s debut collection won the Lambda Literary Award for Trans Poetry. (Image courtesy of Nightboat books.)

‘Hull’ by Xandria Phillips

The American version of me

Xandria Phillips’s debut poetry collection, ‘Hull,’ explores longing, history, emancipation and resistance, and the stakes of precarious living. Matthew John Phillips reviews.
Matthew John Phillips

Matthew John Phillips

Articles 5 minute read
Robin Wasserman's new Philadelphia-set novel traverses the slippery territory of memory and female identity. (Image courtesy of Scribner.)

‘Mother Daughter Widow Wife’ by Robin Wasserman

The mysteries inside

In Robin Wasserman’s new novel, a woman arrives in Philadelphia with no memory. Years later, her daughter sets out to find out what happened to her there, and why she has left again. Kirsten Bowen reviews.
Kirsten Bowen

Kirsten Bowen

Articles 3 minute read