Books

297 results
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An argument as controversial as the title: Jody Armour’s ‘N*gga Theory.’ (Image via LARB Books.)

‘N*gga Theory: Race, Language, Unequal Justice, and the Law,’ by Jody Armour

Reclamation, rejection, or creation: what does agency mean?

Jody Armour’s ‘N*gga Theory’ is an unexpected book title in 2020. In this treatise on modern racial justice, does the author argue successfully for the reclamation of painful language? Lindsay Gary reviews.
Lindsay Gary

Lindsay Gary

Reviews 4 minute read
A history of Philly through French eyes? (Image courtesy of Temple University Press.)

‘Salut! France Meets Philadelphia’ by Lynn Miller and Therese Dolan

In plein sight

From the Founders’ reading lists to the bridges, architecture, and artists that define Philly’s look today, ‘Salut! France Meets Philadelphia’ proves that French style is part of our city’s DNA. Pamela Forsythe reviews.

Pamela J. Forsythe

Reviews 6 minute read
Dissident soldiers have been protesting American conflicts from colonial times the War on Terror. (Image courtesy of The New Press.)

‘I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Dissenters, Deserters & Objectors to America’s Wars’ by Chris Lombardi

Dissenting soldiers

'I Ain’t Marching Anymore' explores the long history of protests by US military members. Elisa Shoenberger reviews.
Elisa Shoenberger

Elisa Shoenberger

Articles 3 minute read
Journalist Talia Lavin tackles far-right groups in her own voice. (Image courtesy of Hachette Books.)

‘Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy’ by Talia Lavin

Exposing hate groups, in her own voice

Talia Lavin, one of the current political moment’s most incisive journalists, details her confrontations with the world’s worst trolls in ‘Culture Warlords.’ Stephen Silver reviews.
Stephen Silver

Stephen Silver

Articles 3 minute read
If you’re used to struggling, what would you do for a six-figure salary? (Image courtesy of Kitty Shields.)

‘Pillar of Heaven’ by Kitty Shields

What’s a paycheck worth?

Young workers trying to survive the shoals of 2020 will relate to Philly author Kitty Shields’s urban fantasy debut, ‘Pillar of Heaven,’ which considers just what a big paycheck is worth. Michelle Nugent reviews.
Michelle Nugent

Michelle Nugent

Articles 3 minute read
Courtney P. Hunter's debut novel explores the relationship between humanity and AI. (Image courtesy of the author.)

'Sentience' by Courtney P. Hunter

Painting humanity by numbers

In Philadelphia writer Courtney P. Hunter’s debut novel, 24 participants enter an experiment to determine who among them is human and who is an artificially intelligent robot. Kirsten Bowen reviews.
Kirsten Bowen

Kirsten Bowen

Articles 3 minute read
An essential read for anyone invested in fighting white supremacy. (Image courtesy of Catapult.)

‘White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color,’ by Ruby Hamad

What white women must face

Ruby Hamad’s debut book, ‘White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color,’ is a provocative and powerful account of white women’s role in white supremacy and the repercussions of their position on women of color. Kelly Conrad reviews.
Kelly Conrad

Kelly Conrad

Articles 3 minute read
Antoine K. Stroman’s debut novel portrays an upbringing not often represented in fiction. (Image courtesy of AuthorHouse.)

‘Seeing Things in Black and White’ by Antoine K. Stroman

The Black experience is stranger than fiction

Despite its flaws, Antoine K. Stroman’s debut novella, ‘Seeing Things in Black and White,’ paints the Black experience in a multitude of colors. Kyle V. Hiller reviews.
Kyle V. Hiller

Kyle V. Hiller

Articles 3 minute read
These Japanese cats make a happy distraction from tense times in the US. (Image courtesy of Countryman Press.)

‘Catland: The Soft Power of Cat Culture in Japan’ by Sarah Archer

Cultural identity through cats

Philadelphia author Sarah Archer’s new book, ‘Catland: The Soft Power of Cat Culture in Japan,’ is a perfect crossover for history buffs and cat lovers. Kyle V. Hiller reviews.
Kyle V. Hiller

Kyle V. Hiller

Articles 3 minute read
A parade of musical characters: a practice session of the Brahms Clarinet Quintet at the conference in 1980. (Photo by Alice Berman.)

‘The Music of Friends’ by David W. Webber

American classical music grows up

Since 1946, Vermont’s Chamber Music Conference has been an important part of American musical life, attracting many Philadelphia luminaries. A new book, ‘The Music of Friends,’ tells the story. Peter Burwasser reviews.

Peter Burwasser

Articles 3 minute read