Get­ting vir­tu­al with SALT, Philadel­phia Orches­tra, the Barnes, and A Very Streamy Purim

3 minute read

While putting this together, I got the urge to put on some Jamiroquai. You remember “Virtual Insanity,” right? Well, if you haven’t checked out more of their catalog beyond that 1996 single (the video still bops, by the way), you’ll come to realize the band’s tunes have everything to do with outer space, the early days of the interwebs, and virtual reality, all intertwined with contemplations around hope and love. Perfect music to vibe to in these trying times, and ample background jams as you consider what to do for your “weekend” (consider that a staff pick of the week, if you will).

Because what even is the weekend at this point?

Cooped Up Cabaret

Each Thursday night, a group of SALT performers will gather for a live performance of music chosen earlier in the week via a poll from its community. The interactive cabaret premieres on YouTube, and this week features picks from Les Misèrables. Check out their Facebook page for more info, including updates on polls, donations, and notifications of when they go live.

Philadelphia Orchestra goes virtual

The Philadelphia Orchestra has unreleased past performances ready to upload weekly and solo and small-ensemble performances coming at you to help quell your quarantine. Audiences can watch a previously unreleased performance of the Virtual Philadelphia Orchestra every Thursday night at 8pm. And if you need a break from weekend screen time, the Orchestra plays unreleased concerts on their Listen On Demand platform on Friday and Saturday nights at 8pm. There are more curated lists waiting for you, too, so check out more of their virtual initiative online.

Barnes does takeout and delivers concerts
I know many of us have probably been taking advantage of all those UberEats and Grubhub discounts, but what if you could have your art delivered to you, too? The Barnes has got you covered. The Barnes Takeout: Your Daily Serving of Art is a new digital initiative to bring daily art straight to you. Featuring curators, scholars, and educators sharing off-the-cuff musings about their favorite works in the Barnes’ collection, they’ll be uploading new videos every day for you to dive into.

Additionally, on Friday, April 3, at 6pm, the Barnes is hosting First Friday online with a performance by Orchestra 2001. The free evening of classical music is titled Unhinged, and you can look out for the link when it goes live here.

Reading of Ithaqa online

A reading of the upcoming 1920s-inspired horror comic series Ithaqa by Michael Watson and Theresa Chiechi streams all this week. While you may have missed the first day on Tuesday, the previous streams are available. History buffs that are fans of noir films and True Detective might want to check this one out. The readings will feature Philly native actress/performer Lisa VillaMil. Catch up on any streams you may have missed on their YouTube channel.

Constituting a crisis

On Friday, April 3, at 1pm, the National Constitution Center will host a free online interactive course, The Constitution in Times of Crisis. Featuring President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, the course will look back at American history and how it coped with constitutional issues through various times, from the Revolution to the COVID-19 pandemic. Register online, and check out the rest of their online course initiatives of free daily online courses: they’re meant for the curious from middle school to college.

A Very Awesome watch party

Still disappointed you didn’t get to catch this year’s A Very Poppy Purim? Yeah, so am I. And even though Purim has passed, that isn’t stopping Very Awesome Arts from bringing Purim to your living room (or wherever you watch your livestreams these days). This Sunday, and every other Sunday, the Very Awesome crew will livestream previous editions of their hit performances. View them online, and be sure to give them a follow. And catch their first stream from a couple of weeks ago. This week will feature their performance of A Very One Hit Purim.

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